Chatsexscandal What is radiocarbon dating process

Radiocarbon dating or in general radioisotopic dating method is used for estimating the age of old archaeological samples. In the upper atmosphere, nitrogen (C in a living plant, were can estimate the age of the object (the age of the object means the number of years ago when plant should have died), by using the formula.

For example, age of the earth, moon, rocks, and mineral deposits can be determined by using the principle of radioisotopic dating. Age of the carbon containing object = t C in it, is called radiocarbon dating.

The age of glaciers, snow fields, and even wines can be estimated by radioisotopic dating.

In these cases, the radioactivity level of tritium (an isotope of hydrogen having mass number of 3) Preserve Articles is home of thousands of articles published and preserved by users like you.

However, human beings love to see factual precision, and we want to know how old something is.

Please remember that all dating methods, even those termed "absolute," are subject to margins of error. That is a very small amount of possible error range. Modern studies almost always use two or more methods to confirm dating work and to build confidence in the results obtained.

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Carbon-14, or radiocarbon, is a naturally occurring radioactive isotope that forms when cosmic rays in the upper atmosphere strike nitrogen molecules, which then oxidize to become carbon dioxide.

Green plants absorb the carbon dioxide, so the population of carbon-14 molecules is continually replenished until the plant dies.

Love-hungry teenagers and archaeologists agree: dating is hard.

But while the difficulties of single life may be intractable, the challenge of determining the age of prehistoric artifacts and fossils is greatly aided by measuring certain radioactive isotopes.

This argument was popularized by Henry Morris (1974, p.164), who used some calculations done in 1968 by Melvin Cook to get the 10,000-year figure. Whitelaw, using a greater ratio of carbon-14 production to decay, concluded that only 5000 years passed since carbon-14 started forming in the atmosphere!